During Rebirth, we haven’t really see much of the Scarlet Speedsters classic villains. And The Flash #14 delves into the Rogues legacy in Central City and what the population thinks of them. It’s also quite self referential about comic book villains as a whole, poking fun at code names and identities. The issue is quietly intelligent that way. It also raises interesting points at how high-profile villains can’t exactly be discreet when everyone in the city knows who they are.

There’s a short but wonderful scene in which Barry, Iris and Wally go to the movies together. And it merely feels like a side step in the story rather than taking a chunk out of it. It doesn’t necessarily take anything away from the main plot, but rather helps add to it. Williamson shows us how to balance relationship sub-plots with a main storyline with ease. It doesn’t add unnecessary drama for Barry, but widens the scope a little. We get a tease of things happening just on the fringes of this story. Daniel West anybody?

Usually, most comics that balance multiple plot lines and styles tend to feel a little bit unorganised and messy. Luckily, that’s not the case with The Flash #14. If anything it’s quite the opposite. It flits Barry in both his normal life and his costumed one without feeling too choppy. For example, when Barry realises it would be easier to investigate in his normal CSI role, it feels organic rather than forced. An added extra that felt seamless was the slight expansion of Snart’s backstory. It’s smaller moments like that in DC Comics as a whole that come across as brilliantly intriguing much more than the crazy action set-pieces. Not that we’re complaining about superheroic fights and general day-saving. But a little character development can really go a long way sometimes.

9.2 Brilliant

The Flash proves just how good this series can be.

  • Plot 9
  • Sub-Plot/Balancing 9.5
  • Character development 9
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